Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens

Miolta SRT101 35mm SLR Film Camera with Minolta 50mm f/1.4 Lens

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£199
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£199
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The Minolta SR-T 101 is a 35mm manual focus SLR camera with Through-The-Lens exposure metering – TTL for short - that was launched in 1966 by Minolta Camera Co. It was aimed at demanding amateur and semi-professional photographers. The SR-T 101 stayed in production for ten years with only minor changes.

The design is based on the Minolta ST-7 model V camera of 1962, but the principal design is inherited from the original 1958 Minolta SR-2. The SR-T 101 however, has several significant features apart from the TTL meter. The most significant one is perhaps the full aperture metering facility, allowing the exposure to be set accurately without stopping down. Full aperture TTL metering was commercially first realised in the 1963 Tokyo Kogaku Topcon RE Super.

Another unique feature of the SR-T 101 besides the open aperture metering at the time of its release to the public at Photokinain 1966 was the so called "CLC"-metering characteristic. "CLC" stands for "contrast-light-compensation" and was a kind of an early Matrix Metering: Two CdS-cells, placed at the front and rear end of the viewfinder prism, provide an overlapping coverage of the center-weighted light-detection area and are electronically coupled together. Therefore the metering system always detects an average of the light travelling through the lens, determined by the contrast division of the metered motive. Landscape photographs with a large area of bright sky and a smaller area of dark ground, for example, are automatically corrected by the contrast-matching "CLC"-metering system. This system works for almost every landscape-format image regardless of the metered contrast range, but requires a much more skilled usage when it comes to portrait-format images. Because of this, Minolta recommended SR-T 101-users to first meter the photographed area and then to swing up the camera for taking the picture to enable the "CLC" an accurate metering.