Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens

Olympus OM40 Program 35mm Film Camera with Makinon 28mm f/2.8 Lens

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The OM40 was released in 1985. It was called OM-PC on some markets.

It has a modified, rubberised body, and is more rugged than the OM 10/20/30, yet cheaper than the OM-2SP. Like the OM-2SP it has a program mode, an aperture priority automatic mode and a manual mode. It has TTL flash automation, and a metering system called 'ESP' — a basic matrix system with two zones: center and edges. If the meter detects great differences in light between the center and the corners (e.g. a person wearing black against a white wall), it will disregard the corners in order to correctly expose the center. This mode works fine when the subject is placed centrally, but is not ideal for more artistic compositions.

The OM40 features the highest OM system integration of any of the double-digit bodies, though also strangely offers the lowest fps with the motor drive (3.5fps opposed to 5fps for all other compatible OM bodies)

Use of the program mode requires the user to manually stop down the aperture to the smallest they wish to use. The camera will hold the aperture open until the shutter is released and will choose a medium or high speed that correlates to a correct exposure, stopping down to the user-set minimum if necessary, but no further. In practice, the user would generally use f/16 in program mode, and shutter speeds good enough to freeze action (e.g. 1/250s) would be used.

As with the OM 10/20/30, the focusing screen is fixed, but it can accept all the motor drives/winders.

The OM40 only existed in black finish.