Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5

Rollei 35 LED Film Camera with Triotar 40mm f/3.5

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£165
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£165
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The Rollei 35 is a 35mm miniature viewfinder camera built by Rollei. The original Rollei 35, when introduced at photokina in 1966, was the smallest existing 135 film camera. The Rollei 35 series remains one of the smallest 35 mm cameras after the Minolta TC-1 and Minox 35. In 30 years, about 2 million Rollei 35 series cameras were manufactured. The Rollei 35 was manufactured by DHW Fototechnik up to 2015, the successor of Franke & Heidecke as small-batch production.[1] The last version is the Rollei 35 Classic, an updated Rollei 35 SE.


Preceded by two concept studies, the entry-level model with a triplet lens, the Zeiss Triotar f 3.5 / 40 mm, hit the market in October 1969. Initially, for the first concept study, Compur was asked for a simplified shutter with a limited timing range of 1/30 sec to 1/125 sec, which, however, was not cheap enough for an effective reduction in production cost.

Therefore, the first concept study got an immovable lens tube. The original movable sliding tube was one of the most expensive parts, because it had to be precisely manufactured on a lathe for a light tight fitting. The second concept study retained the sliding tube for the lens, but used a selenium light meter. A light meter for the accessory shoe was assigned to be built by Gossen in early 1968, but finally an uncoupled light meter was integrated in the camera housing.


Aperture and shutter control on the lens barrel of a Rollei B35
The camera received the designation Rollei B 35, with the "B" indicating the light meter (German: Belichtungsmesser), a slightly cheaper model, omitting the light meter, was called Rollei C 35 for compact camera. Naturally, the innards of the camera were simplified by using more plastic parts. The control wheels on the camera body were replaced by a more conventional aperture control at the lens tube, and the control wheel for exposure time was placed at the sliding tube base on the body. Thus, the fully inserted lens protruded a bit more from the camera body, than in the previous model. Both of these models offered a shutter timing range from 1/30 sec to 1/500 sec and an aperture range from f/3.5 to f/22. The focusing range reaches from 3 feet (0.9m) to infinity. Two pairs of dots on the lens barrel indicate the depth-of-field for f/8 and f/16. The so-called Zeiss formula was inspired by this camera.

Especially for the North American market, a special edition with an artificial leather covering in traffic-red, yellow-orange, deer-brown, steel-blue and white was produced, counting 100 items for each color. But as these test samples did not cause much interest, they were not quoted in any price list.